Still Mad After All These Years… - Graves' Disease and Thyroid Discussion - Living with Graves Disease

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Still Mad After All These Years…

Graves TED Pretibial myxedema Graves Rage Ongoing psychiatric problems Frontal lobes

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#1 Gilly66

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 01:39 AM

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[color=#262f36;][font="verdana;"]I was treated for Graves’ disease, TED and Graves dermopathy in 2000 here in Shropshire, UK, after many years of misdiagnosis. I had all aspects of the disease, eyes and skin and an all over tremor for four years and other symptoms dating back a further four years at the very least, was finally sent to a psychiatrist and he diagnosed the Graves' instantly, just looking at my eyes and my all over tremor, I had a resting heartbeat of 135. I was lucky, I could have ended up being sectioned and treated for psychosis! [/color][/font]

 

[color=#262f36;][font="verdana;"]Now it is 2016 and my personality never has returned to normal. My handwriting and signature changed which has caused all kinds of legal and banking problems, I cannot plan or organise anymore, even simple tasks are beyond me and I still get 'Graves' rage'. My family do not recognise the person I have become and my marriage was over even before I was diagnosed because of my crazy behaviour. I was told I would get back to the old me, that has not been the case. I am now hypothyroid and take Levo 125g. (actually I am now, for the past few months, taking NDT 3 grains). [/color][/font]

 

[color=#262f36;][font="verdana;"]My skin resolved itself just 3 years ago and my skin is now clear after more than 17 years of misery! Why am I so changed? Why have I not returned to anywhere near to the calm, collected, rational loving person who was a great organiser and who's profession had been a Production Planner? Now I cannot even plan a simple meal at home! [/color][/font]

 

[color=#262f36;][font="verdana;"]Doctors have given up on me long ago. My eyes were operated on, my TSH returned to normal, their job is done and I am left floundering in misery, my old friends gave up on me long ago. I do not blame them for that, if I could escape from me I would.

I was sent information from a researcher in Graves' disease, I had contacted him in despair some years ago, he had worked with one of the top Graves' people in the US and he told me about a doctor in New York who had done detailed research into Graves' patients who had not recovered mentally, the doctor in New York had discovered changes to their frontal lobes using imaging. I had his address and photographs of the various brains. I lost all this, as I loose everything! Does anyone know of this research at all? I had the doctor's research, imagine pictures, address and even telephone and email address, all lost. I have tried to find it on the internet to no avail. This was sent to be around 2004-2006 by the researcher who I have also lost contact with. He was working out of a Hospital in Dublin. I believe he now lives in New Zealand. [/color][/font]

 

[color=#262f36;][font="verdana;"]I do know of only one other person like me, he is a Vicar who wrote an article for the UK TED magazine, some years ago called “The Anger Within" he too was having continuing mental distress and was asking "what had Graves' TED, done to my brain" this many years after his treatment. I still have his article. [/color][/font]

 

[color=#262f36;][font="verdana;"]I feel a freak when I try to explain all this to my GP or any doctor, they just offer anti depressants, which are no help at all, I want me back or an explanation why I am like this not more drugs! I wrote to Mr Vanderpump, one of the top Thyroid experts in the UK, he said to see a psychiatrist; it is no longer a thyroid problem. However if it is damage in the brain caused by Graves" who's problem is it? The doctor in New York was a Thyroid doctor and he was looking into brain changes. I just feel very alone and abandoned by doctors. [/color][/font]




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#2 mmztcass

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 02:26 PM

Hi Gilly66 and welcome:

 

Thank you for coming over to this forum.  As I mentioned in the other forum, I was asking if your Free T3 and Free T4 got tested because you only mentioned about having the TSH done.  And to go further with this as indicated down below in my signature, I have had GD for 15 years now.  I treat with very low dose MMI (Methimazole) and work on keeping my Free Ts in the mid to the near upper third lab reference ranges to feel my best there and as a guide to help avoid the very symptoms you speak of.  

 

Most thyroid experts (doctors, etc.) do not seem to realize the delicate balance we need with our Free Ts to feel our best there at to avoid any mental symptoms.  Many experts only look at the TSH. 

 

Elaine Moore talks about this:

 

http://elaine-moore....ts/Default.aspx

 

http://elaine-moore....55/Default.aspx

 

If you could post your last several lab results along with how meds and which ones were taken at each time, we can better help you to work on getting back on track.  Having a thyroid disease is a lifelong process with ups and downs.  

 

Are only the TSH is being checked?  

 

Thanks and {{{hugs}}}



#3 Hart

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 06:35 PM

Hi Ginny66

 

Can relate big time to brain and emotional issues. At one stage working memory was zilch. Would write lists to help and lose them within seconds. Episodes of unexplained crying. A brain that jumped to conclusions, illogical thinking, paranoia. Anxiety. Muscle pain. Tinnitus. Sleeplessness. Exhaustion. Isolating myself. Useless doctors.

 

Best thing I did was to go to a private functional medicine GP. He identified fully blown coeliac disease (on top of the graves and osteoporosis). I had tried paleo however in retrospect I am sensitive even to eating nuts processed in gluten handling factories. Damn stuff is everywhere. That gluten affected my brain tremendously.

 

So I've dumped gluten, dairy, coffee. Am working on sugar. In process of getting mercury fillings out by holistic dentist. Am in process of getting an infrared sauna for detoxing. Am pushing myself to take regular exercise. I take a load of supplements at present because of the coeliac affects on nutrient absorbtion. Will be getting vitamin and mineral levels checked later this year. I don't drink chemically treated water. I am planning to trial the autoimmune paleo diet (See Hashimotos 411 website). Am about to read Why isn't my brain working by Datis Kharrazian. Am looking into an online course about Hashi's cos apparently that's where I'm headed.

 

The info and support I received on this sight has also been invaluable.Maybe you have tried alternative Doc's, naturopaths? I encourage you to try again. Are you trying any specific dietary measures?

 

Best to you

D



#4 Gilly66

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 01:58 AM

I have never had my free T3 or T4 tested. Years ago when I was still under an Endo, must have been around 2003, because I was complaining of all these mental issues, he did tests on my Adrenals, involving injections and blood taking as I remember, he said they were fine. Not long after I was turned over to my GP and have not seen an Endo since. 

 

I have become doctor phobic and tend to see my GP as little as possible. Since being on NDT for the past six months of course my TSH is suppressed and she has demanded blood test after blood test. I have an appointment with her on 19 April and I will tell her then I am taking NDT, she will not be happy. One thing the NDT has helped with and unexpectedly, my mouth is no longer dry, even my dentist noticed how much better and healthier my mouth is now, after so many years. 

 

I take B12 and a B vitamin complex, a mega fish oil, D3 and a mineral complex all from BioCare here in the UK. BioCare is recommended by Sarah Myhill who was once my GP, long before my thyroid problems. She is now a well recommended (By Stop the Thyroid Madness UK) private doctor for people with thyroid problems here in the UK, her fees are way out of my budget I'm afraid. She no longer accepts new patients but she was prepared to accept me as an old NHS patient of hers but the fees were just beyond me sadly. 

I know my TPO was 1500+ in 2004 but I was told it was nothing to worry about. I think those were the last blood results I was ever given a print out off. When I have asked about TPO since I was told they were not available. So just my TSH was ever mentioned. I know I should press doctors more but my mental health problems seem to stop me, I dread talking to doctors. 

 

 



#5 Gilly66

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 02:01 AM

At least I have no mercury fillings, all my teeth problems have been since Graves' no fillings before and I knew to avoid mercury by the time my teeth began to need endless fillings, root canal work and crowns!  :)



#6 Gilly66

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 02:11 AM

[color=rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;] "A brain that jumped to conclusions, illogical thinking, paranoia. Anxiety. Muscle pain. Exhaustion. Isolating myself. Useless doctors."[/color]

 

[color=rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;]Snap to all the above, I can sleep though, there was a time I could sleep 18 hours a day![/color]



#7 Hart

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 03:16 AM

Hey Gilly 66

 

Yep and snap to avoiding Docs like the plague! It seemed pointless cos they didn't get it, even dangerous given some of the treatment I got. I also had a mental wall, graves given I'm sure, to dealing with conflict and I certainly felt conflicted about dealing with them. Additionally for all the myriad of symptoms I had and didn't understand, I thought I was neurotic! Easy to get down on yourself when all this stuff is going on. It was good to see a different sort of Doc and have a reassessment and I certainly enjoyed taking the results to the GP who had ordered the same old tests (which were fine) while the new ones were anything but.

 

BTW, the first case study in that book I mentioned above identified marked deterioration in handwriting and memory. Might be worth a look. Thanks for the tip on Biocare products, will be taking a look.

 

As for the blood results, here I can fill in a form at the lab so that the results will be emailed to me directly. Alternatively I make it clear to the Doc that I have the blood tests (ugh) for my benefit, not theirs i.e. I want the results. I have had snippy receptionists who appear put out by my requests for said results (Oh yes, we'll inform you if anything is not right..), sorry don't care. My right. My health. Cheers. I even got one helpful Nurse to give me copies of correspondence from the Endo which was most useful.

 

Am currently struggling with sugar. But you know what, it's a good thing. It's something I can see affects me and so I at least have a fighting chance of dealing to it.



#8 StCeciliasGirl

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 12:32 PM

I avoided the RAI and TT, but only by great fortune: I had been fortunate to find THIS place, because I had been misdiagnosed for so many years (stupid stuff, like "cocaine addiction" when I've never done it, and had to pay US $400 out-of-pocket for some hair test to "prove" I wasn't on cocaine. "Anorexia", too). I later had proof (an old CBC from an ER) that showed I had no TSH in 2009, but it wasn't until my eyes went bad real fast in 2013 that I even knew I had a thyroid, much less was diagnosed.

 

By that time, they had me on Ativan and Xanax. I'm told it saved my life (they had given me beta blockers, not propanolol, but the first 2 they tried caused allergic reactions). By 2013 I'd had heart tests and brain scans and you name it, but ultimately I was diagnosed with "anxiety". Period. The Xanax I suppose kept the "jitters" down, and other clinical symptoms, but 2 shrinks and a psych doc or two "cleared" me of any sort of odd-thinking (hyperthyroids don't get depression, or at least I didn't, which threw off the psych people who sent me back to medical). So my GP just said "shut up and take the Xanax." And it worked, so I couldn't really complain except I went from US size 8 to US size 0 or even 00. (I'm still addicted to the Xanax, btw, but I'm weaning off. VERY slowly this time, as it causes seizures to come off too fast.)

EVEN WITH this forum though, and everyone here educating me about anti-thyroid blockers (MMI or PTU) being better than "killing my thyroid" (because you have Graves if your thyroid is there or not), the doctors scared me. But here, I learned how to back down on my MMI dose so I wouldn't feel so "hypO" miserable, which seemed to be what the doctors wanted. Also, the doctors rarely gave me the panels people here told me to get (Ft3, Ft4); usually it was a crapshoot which thyroid panels I would get. I even took in notes from here so there would be no misunderstandings, but you HAVE to know how to argue with those idiot doctors (and when you don't feel well, all the thyroid information is a blur, so I took in CHARTS and DIAGRAMS, lol, explaining why FT3/FT4 was a better measure than other tests). Oh, and my "endocrinologist" (I use the word IRONICALLY) would say she would check my FT3s, but then the office would call and would have crazy results. To this day I'm not sure if they were simply incompetent, or that sure that "euthyroid" was impossible. My original doctors. were. PUSHY.

 

And I know Graves isn't a mental disease (BOY do I know that), but if you aren't treated, or if you're over-treated, you simply CAN'T think right. I prayed and prayed but in 2014 I caved to the pressure, and started the RAI process. (My husband took a week off work, and my kids came too). The MIRACLE for me is that the MMI had worked (because of advice from here: simple things that my doctors disagreed with, like taking MMI twice daily) and when they "flashed" me (RAIU, the test to see how much radaioactive iodine I would need), I didn't need enough to warrant RAI!

 

I was too freaked out to understand at the time (and very frustrated; I just wanted to "get it over with"), and I was deeply ashamed to come here and admit that I was going to cave and do RAI, but the truth is that using the MMI advice from HERE, my thyroid was functioning normally within 6 months. And I was euthyroid ever since, maintaining with "crumbs" of MMI, until last year (I saw my daughter get t-boned; car broke in half; very stressful).

 

At least by that time (a year ago now), I knew I'd probably shoot out of remission (STRESS!), but I didn't know how bad, or what other issues might come up that turned out to be thyroid-related. It doesn't "sound" fortunate, but after getting my hypER numbers back down, I realized my gynecologist knew more about thyroid/Graves (and Hashimotos) than my "endocrinologists" (two of them), or my GP. So my gynecologist is the one who is handling my Graves now, and she doesn't push for thyroid killing, or hysterectomies, or anything shocking. She has "eased" me back towards remission #s.

 

I'm angry, also, though. I'm angry that doctors are know-nothings about thyroid conditions, though hormones play such a huge role in EVERYONE'S lives (male, female, regardless of age). And that they blame everything else before looking at thyroid. I might not have dark glasses now had they caught it in time. (I have some kind of optical nerve damage. It really hurt.) And I was going to doctors a lot "suddenly": heart, lungs, etc — but until my eyes went bad in 2013, not one doc thought my typical Graves symptoms (like dropping from 21 BMI to 16 BMI in 6 months! And tachycardia, and apparent "panic attacks") were thyroid-related.

 

Really: do yourself a favor and find a doctor that TRULY has some clue about a thyroid. You still have Graves, so you should be getting Graves' tests (UK covers that, right?) What makes me most mad is that people with Graves DO get to a point where they can't think clearly if they're not under DECENT medical supervision. You'll know when you find a "decent" doctor: when you start feeling better, and thinking more clearly. It's just very hard to find that doctor. DON'T be offended if anyone calls you crazy or a hypochondriac — keep pushing until you find a REAL doctor with half-a-brain. And when you feel like it, raid the Elaine Moore forums, too (there seem to be many people there who have had RAI and TTs; she helps them a lot.)



#9 mmztcass

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 04:21 PM

Hi Gilly66:

 

Thanks for letting us know about having only the TSH tested.  

 

Now would be the time to start getting the Free T3 and the Free T4 tested to see what is going on.  The replacement med you take which is a FT4 med, is very important to know what is going on with the FT4 to be able to adjust it.  As for the FT3 also another important test because many people after getting the RAI done, do not do well with converting the T4 to the T3 which can stay low and give a lot of problems/symptoms.  Then if that's a case with having a low FT3, taking a T3 med is likely to be necessary to feel better.  

 

I would encourage you to read through the Thyroid 101 through here at this board (if you haven't already) to get acquaint what needs to be done to work with being proactive with thyroid disease.  

 

I would insist to the doctor(s) to begin testing the Free T3 and the Free T4 and to work with dosing the meds properly according to the Free Ts.  The TSH really cannot be used to dose meds to when one has positive thyroid antibodies which falsely skews the readings.  

 

Another website besides researching at Elaine Moore's can also check out Stop The Thyroid Madness - http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/ and research there as well.

 

I am sorry that you are having to go through all these things and not get tested properly or likely not medicated properly to get the balance needed to feel better at.   :( 

 

{{{hugs}}}



#10 Gilly66

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 01:59 AM

mmztcass

I have not had RAI, I was treated with Carbimazole, beta blockers and antidepressants and was told in around 2004 that my thyroid was burnt out and I was now hypothyroid and put onto Levo which I was taking until around 7 months ago, always felt dreadful on it. I feel better on the NDT but my mental health problems have not improved. I managed to get off the antidepressants finally at the beginning of last year. 

 

It is impossible to get a Free T3 or free T4 test in the UK on the NHS and my funds do not enable me to go private for tests. My thoughts are that I am not converting T4 to T3 when on Levo, or as the Graves' researcher who helped me believed, I could have frontal lobe damage, as the frontal lobes do come under attack, just like our eyes do, when we have Graves' and TED. All my symptoms are the same as someone who crashes their car and damages their frontal lobes that way. I spoke to someone from Head Way a brain injury charity here in the UK and she thought I should see a doctor/specialist who would be able to do a series of tests to find out if my frontal lobes are involved in my inability to function properly. So I am going to ask my GP for a referral. 

 

Once I know for sure if it is physical damage or not then I can move on. I was listening to the wife of James Cracknell (the Olympic rower) on a radio programme here in the UK, Woman's Hour, talking about his bike accident in South America, where he damaged his frontal lobes…all his symptoms matched mine, it was uncanny and led me to start looking for the research I was sent years ago about Graves' disease and frontal lobe damage caused by Graves.

They already know that the madness we get when untreated is the attack on out brains, so it does make sense that, just like my eyes, it does not always return to normal, especially when under attack for a long period of time. Graves' people use to end up in lunatic asylums in the old days and even today people are sectioned and put into psychiatric hospitals, some even die because they are treated as psychotic. I have  an article about a woman who was hospitalised and treated only for her mental symptoms, not tested for her thyroid and who died in hospital, this was in the 1990's not the 1890s! 



#11 Gilly66

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 02:18 AM

StCeciliasGirl

 

I too am angry and frustrated with everything to do with doctors and thyroid disease. So many of us seem to have these awful journeys where we are regarded as 'on' something or hysterical or crazy, or  it is all in our head and I know I have been labelled a [color=rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;]hypochondriac[/color]. When I broke my pelvis and could hardly walk my GP did not even request an X-ray so sure was he it was all in my head. I thought I had developed Lupus, which can develop alongside Graves' I was terrified!! I got a referral to a Lupus clinic and they did an X-ray and my badly broken pelvis was revealed. I just thought I was going mad when every doctor I saw patted me on the head and said ,"there, there" and I was finally sent to a psychiatrist!   Says everything about how doctors saw me, to them I was a mad women and being untreated for years I was of course getting madder and madder.

 

Also of course it tends to happen to many in their late 40s so then we are 'menopausal' so a little crazy anyway as far as many doctors are concerned. With me, with my all over body tremor, my eyes, racing heart and skin, some doctor should have twigged, it should have rung alarm bells to at least one of the many doctors I saw, dermatologists, eye doctors, GP's all ignored and I was sent to a shrink! I wonder how many men with Graves' are ever sent to a shrink?

 

By the way when I broke my pelvis, they said it was as if I had come off a horse at 30 mile an hour, just sitting down on a kitchen chair, that was how bad my bones were three years after being treated for Graves'. No one told me to take D3 or calcium to take care of my bones and teeth! 

 

I should add I also had a [color=rgb(0,0,0);font-family:arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;font-size:13px;]goitre, I tend to forget that fact, so no excuse for the doctors really. One dermatologist did notice it and asked me what the lump in my neck was[/color]…I told my GP and he ignored as usual, this was about six months before I was finally diagnosed. 



#12 mmztcass

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 01:57 PM

Hi Gilly66:

 

I apologized, my mistake for thinking you had an RAI.  f you haven't yet, getting in touch with Elaine Moore at:  elaine-moore.com might help you.  Hopefully some people from the UK will respond to you here.

 

{{{hugs}}}



#13 Gilly66

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 01:58 PM

I have just found this, not the New York study I have been looking for but interesting:

 

Abstract

Patients with hyperthyroidism may show impaired performance on several neuropsychological tests that require complex visual discrimination, conceptualization, mental flexibility or organization. These neurocognitive impairments appear to be consistent with prefrontal lobe dysfunction.

 

Taken from: http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9802130



#14 Hart

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:08 PM

Of interest. In an article about fermented food,a nutritional biochemist ("Dr Libby") states "A healthy balance of bacteria in our gut governs the functioning of many systems including the immune system and metabolism. It plays a critical role in our mood and brain function.. The health of our gut is central to every aspect of health".



#15 mmztcass

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:21 PM

Eating something like raw organic sauerkraut is good.   :) 

 

{{{hugs}}} 



#16 mmztcass

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:27 PM

Gilly66:

 

I spoke with the gal living in UK who has been part of the board in the past.  You should be able to insist to your doctor, at least, to order the Free T4 along with the TSH to see if your levels are correct for taking the replacement med that you are on.  It shouldn't cost extra.  The gal says she would order the FT3 from Lab24 to see what it was doing.  

 

{{{hugs}}}



#17 Gilly66

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 02:22 AM

mmztcass

 

Thank you for that information, I am seeing my doctor on the 19 April and I am going to try again with her, taking in literature and information you have given me. I had a blood test last week and will ask for a print out this time. I will also ask for a free T4 test and see what she says. 

I do know about the importance of the gut to our overall health. I have even heard it called our second brain  :)



#18 Gilly66

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 04:15 AM

MMZTCASS

 

I have just found this:

                

 

 

[color=#255584;][font="arial;"]Intellectual impairment after hyperthyroidism[/color][/font]

[color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"].    [/color][/font][color=#262626;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"][color=#262626;]Hans Perrild[/color][/color][/font][color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"], [color=#262626;]Jens M. Hansen[/color][/color], [color=#262626;]Klaus Arnung[/color][/font], [color=#262626;]Poul Z. Olsen[/color] and [color=#262626;]Ulla Danielsen[/color]

[color=#255584;][font="arial;"]Abstract[/color][/font]

[color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"]Abstract. Electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological tests empirically shown to be sensitive to diffuse cerebral damage were performed in 26 patients 10 years after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism and in a control group with non-toxic goitre. In the hyperthyroid state 81% had abnormal EEG before treatment, and 10 years after treatment 68% still had abnormal EEG compared with 41% in the control group (P < 0.05). In 7 out of 11 neuropsychological tests the previously hyperthyroid patients showed significant impairment compared with the control group. Twenty-three per cent of the patients displayed marked to severe intellectual impairment, 31% moderate and 41% slight or no impairment compared with 0%, 31% and 69%, respectively, in the control group (P < 0.05). Four patients had been granted disability pension on the basis of the intellectual dysfunction. Signs of intellectual impairment indicating irreversible brain dysfunction after thyrotoxicosis thus seem to be a frequent, finding.[/color][/font]



#19 Gilly66

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 04:20 AM

MMZTCASS

 

I have just found this:

                

 

 

[color=#255584;][font="arial;"]Intellectual impairment after hyperthyroidism[/color][/font]

[color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"].    [/color][/font][color=#262626;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"][color=#262626;]Hans Perrild[/color][/color][/font][color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"], [color=#262626;]Jens M. Hansen[/color][/color], [color=#262626;]Klaus Arnung[/color][/font], [color=#262626;]Poul Z. Olsen[/color] and [color=#262626;]Ulla Danielsen[/color]

[color=#255584;][font="arial;"]Abstract[/color][/font]

[color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"]Abstract. Electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological tests empirically shown to be sensitive to diffuse cerebral damage were performed in 26 patients 10 years after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism and in a control group with non-toxic goitre. In the hyperthyroid state 81% had abnormal EEG before treatment, and 10 years after treatment 68% still had abnormal EEG compared with 41% in the control group (P < 0.05). In 7 out of 11 neuropsychological tests the previously hyperthyroid patients showed significant impairment compared with the control group. Twenty-three per cent of the patients displayed marked to severe intellectual impairment, 31% moderate and 41% slight or no impairment compared with 0%, 31% and 69%, respectively, in the control group (P < 0.05). Four patients had been granted disability pension on the basis of the intellectual dysfunction. Signs of intellectual impairment indicating irreversible brain dysfunction after thyrotoxicosis thus seem to be a frequent, finding.[/color][/font]

 

MMZTCASS

 

I have just found this:

                

 

 

[color=#255584;][font="arial;"]Intellectual impairment after hyperthyroidism[/color][/font]

[color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"].    [/color][/font][color=#262626;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"][color=#262626;]Hans Perrild[/color][/color][/font][color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"], [color=#262626;]Jens M. Hansen[/color][/color], [color=#262626;]Klaus Arnung[/color][/font], [color=#262626;]Poul Z. Olsen[/color] and [color=#262626;]Ulla Danielsen[/color]

[color=#255584;][font="arial;"]Abstract[/color][/font]

[color=#2f2b2a;][font="'lucida sans unicode';"]Abstract. Electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological tests empirically shown to be sensitive to diffuse cerebral damage were performed in 26 patients 10 years after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism and in a control group with non-toxic goitre. In the hyperthyroid state 81% had abnormal EEG before treatment, and 10 years after treatment 68% still had abnormal EEG compared with 41% in the control group (P < 0.05). In 7 out of 11 neuropsychological tests the previously hyperthyroid patients showed significant impairment compared with the control group. Twenty-three per cent of the patients displayed marked to severe intellectual impairment, 31% moderate and 41% slight or no impairment compared with 0%, 31% and 69%, respectively, in the control group (P < 0.05). Four patients had been granted disability pension on the basis of the intellectual dysfunction. Signs of intellectual impairment indicating irreversible brain dysfunction after thyrotoxicosis thus seem to be a frequent, finding.[/color][/font]



#20 mmztcass

mmztcass

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 01:55 PM

Hi:

 

Thank you.  

 

I see that Elaine has included couple of articles/research at her forum.  I would want to make sure to get the Free T3 and Free T4 checked and balanced as much as possible to avoid much of these symptoms.  If the doctor is only checking the TSH  and never the Free Ts, problems can persist.

 

{{{hugs}}}







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Graves, TED, Pretibial myxedema, Graves Rage, Ongoing psychiatric problems, Frontal lobes


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